Today: Oct 19 , 2018

Opinion: Is California Becoming Upper Mexico?
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What exactly is the state of California?

The state of my birth, California, is quickly becoming Upper Mexico. Some of this transition can be attributed to the huge influx of illegal aliens lured there by sanctuary cities and state policies. Some of change is surely due to the easy access to free education, rent subsidies, loose welfare requirements and an unwillingness on the part of social workers to even suggest an investigation into the fraud used by some to obtain these benefits. That is not to suggest that all or even a majority of those receiving government largesse are committing fraud, but when there is little or no government oversight, no one can say for sure how much abuse of the system there really is.

But all of that is only part of the reason California is looking more and more like Mexico in many different categories of the so-called social fabric. Those that visit Mexico can see the difference in different areas. The tourist areas are clean, and the population is hospitable. If all of Mexico was like these areas, there would be no one crossing our southern border illegally. If one dares to travel into the barrios inhabited by the poor Mexicans, one would see people living in hovels, where running water and electricity are often luxuries, a sewer system, if there is one, is inadequate. The streets are seldom paved and liter is omnipresent. 

Compare that to parts of San Francisco and Los Angeles, that are not only sanctuary cities in a sanctuary state, but actually cater to the homeless population by not arresting and prosecuting those who urinate, defecate, fornicate, sodomize, masturbate or shoot up illegal drugs in public. This is the antithesis of the “broken windows” theory that, simply put, states that leaving a broken window unrepaired invites others to break more windows, but if the window is fixed, no more windows will be broken. The so-called leaders in these cities not only turn a blind eye to these odious crimes, they usually double down on them. They pass out clean hypodermic needles to drug addicts. Wonderful. That will put a stop to drug use and liter of used needles on the street. How is that much different than the poorest barrio in Mexico? 

There are three economic classes in Mexico. A minority of very rich, an ever shrinking middle class and a large destitute population. The politicians in California seem to want to emulate the Mexican economic classes. They are raising taxes and making so many regulations that small businesses are moving to other, more business friendly states. The middle class is shrinking. Even some of the working wealthy, are moving to states like Florida and Texas that don't have the confiscatory income taxes that California has. Others in the elite class pay accountants to take advantage of every loop hole in the state income tax. The middle class can't afford these accountants and so they are moving out of the once Golden State. 

Law enforcement in Mexico has been corrupt for decades, if not longer. When cops in California are forbidden by their superiors, both political and in their own organizations, to enforce laws that are on the books, crime will increase. When the political leaders shorten sentences of duly convicted criminals for such specious reasons as “systemic” racism or “draconian” sentences for so-called non-violent crimes, crime will rise. Apparently, those leading California have never heard of plea bargaining.

Mexico would have suffered a violent revolution half a century ago if it didn't have a porous border with the United States that acts as a release valve for its people. Mexico doesn't provide an economy that can supply jobs to support its population. California is moving in that direction.

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 Buz Williams


Buz Williams, Opinion Columnist

Richard F. "Buz" Williams was born into a police family.  His father, both grandfathers, a great uncle and a cousin were all on the Los Angeles Police Department and he also had an uncle on the Hawthorne, California Police Department.  Buz served for 29 years on the Long Beach, California Police Department were he worked Patrol, Juvenile, Vice, Auto Theft and Gangs.  He retired in December of 2002.  Buz has been married to his wife Judi for 44 years.  They have two grown sons who live in Southern California with their families, which include two daughter-in-laws, three grandsons and a granddaughter.  Buz and Judi have lived in Prescott since 2004.  

Website: https://www.facebook.com/BuzCop