Today: Jun 05 , 2020

On A War Footing
Featured

05 April 2020  

That's what it feels like, that our country is at war.

Many in the media, President Trump and other Administration officials and experts have said that we are in a war with the Chinese Corona virus or COVID-19. That's what it feels like, that our country is at war. When any country is on a war footing, the government encroaches more on the liberties of its people. While in peace time this would be intolerable, in war, citizens will give up some of their freedoms in an effort to assist the war effort. In the history of our country, Americans have acceded to our government demands in time of war, sometimes enthusiastically.

During World War II, our people accepted the rationing of fuel, some foods, and sugar, restricted travel and the censoring of letters to and from military personnel. Driving during hours of darkness was restricted, For a while, black out shades or lights off were required to keep our cities from being illuminated. There was some hysteria. A Japanese submarine was sighted off the California coast near Santa Barbara as it fired upon aviation fuel tanks just beyond the beach. Some citizens in the area claimed to have seen “signal lights” from shore to the sub. President Roosevelt later used this as part of a justification for the internment of Japanese American citizens and legal Japanese aliens.

Other Americans responded to government requests. They voluntarily turned their efforts to assist in winning the war. They enthusiastically grew “victory gardens” and recycled metal, tires and other commodities needed for the war. Men and women volunteered to work with the United Service Organization, (USO), to entertain, comfort and feed those in our military. All of these things were done to help the nation to come together in support of the war effort.

Our private industries converted their peace time manufacturing into war time production. Auto manufacturers started making Jeeps and tanks. Airplane factories started putting out war planes. Companies whose main products were sewing machines and electric razors started to make pistols and other weapons. Ship yards began building aircraft carriers, destroyers, submarines, cruisers, and landing craft. Military, civilian, industrial and agricultural parts of our economy came together and these very positive actions were reported in a unifying way in the media of the day, that consisted of newspapers, magazines and radio.

Today is different era and a different population, but there are a lot of similarities between World War II and the war we are currently waging against the corona virus. Like Americans of the past, we are today making sacrifices. The vast majority of us have voluntarily given up our First Amendment freedom “peacefully to assemble.” We have less than voluntarily given up our right to go to sporting events, theaters and eat in restaurants. We have done this with a whole lot less moaning and groaning than most of us would have expected.

At one of his daily corona virus briefings, the President brought up four executives from companies that have started manufacturing much needed medical equipment. Executives from My Pillow, Proctor & Gambol, Jockey and United Technologies came to the microphone and explained what they were doing for this medical war effort. They aren't the only ones. There are over fifty other companies that have come forward to help us in this medical emergency. Now if only the mainstream media would start reporting rather than pressing their agenda, our country might become united. It seems to be beyond their capabilities, though. It seems that most of those in the media are trying to divide us, separate us from our leaders and in some cases, raise concerns to a near hysterical level.

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Buz Williams

Buz Williams

Richard F. "Buz" Williams was born into a police family.  His father, both grandfathers, a great uncle and a cousin were all on the Los Angeles Police Department and he also had an uncle on the Hawthorne, California Police Department.  Buz served for 29 years on the Long Beach, California Police Department were he worked Patrol, Juvenile, Vice, Auto Theft and Gangs.  He retired in December of 2002.  Buz has been married to his wife Judi for 44 years.  They have two grown sons who live in Southern California with their families, which include two daughter-in-laws, three grandsons and a granddaughter.  Buz and Judi have lived in Prescott since 2004.

Website: https://www.facebook.com/BuzCop