Today: Jul 14 , 2020

Warm, Sunny Record-Breaking Week Ahead
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27 April 2020   Dr. Mark Sinclair, Ph.D.

A warm, dry week ahead, with near record highs on Wednesday.

Forecast table

https://www.wrh.noaa.gov/forecast/wxtables/

Navigate on the map to your location and click.

Weather Forecast:

Today through Wednesday will be mostly sunny and dry, with highs rising by about 3 degrees F each day, and reaching into the low 90s on Wednesday. Continuing dry and mostly sunny for the rest of the week with a cooling trend through the weekend, with highs falling to around 80 by Sunday. These afternoon highs will, of course, vary by elevation, with a roughly 5.4 degree F decrease for every 1,000 ft elevation gain. It will be breezy each afternoon, with winds gusting to around 20-25 kt most days, although Tuesday and Wednesday should see lighter winds.

Additional notes for the weather nuts out there:

This warmer weather is caused by an upper ridge of high pressure. Air, like most substances, expands when it is heated. Thus, on a hot day, we have to climb higher to reach a certain pressure level. The 500 mb height is the altitude of the 500 mb pressure surface in meters above sea level. When the 500 mb height is high we have an upper ridge of high pressure and warmer temperatures. When it is low, we have a trough of low pressure and it is cooler. In http://meteo.pr.erau.edu/gfs/loop_pmap_gfs_nh.gif you can see a hemispheric loop of 500 mb height and shaded height anomalies (departures from normal). Where it is shaded red, 500 mb heights (and temperatures) are warmer than normal and where it is blue, it is cooler. This is an easy way to see likely regions of forecast warming and cooling on a larger scale.

Have a great week!

Mark Sinclair, Ph.D.
Program Chair and Professor, Meteorology
Department of Applied Aviation Sciences, College of Aviation

3700 Willow Creek Rd
Prescott, AZ 86301
928.777.3842
sinclam@erau.edu

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Met Mail is an unofficial weather discussion and forecast transmitted once or twice a week via e-mail by the Embry-Riddle Department of Meteorology (http://meteo.pr.erau.edu/). Embry-Riddle offers an undergraduate bachelor-of-science degree program in Applied Meteorology. Please spread the word to all potential qualified candidates!

Further Information:

ERAU Applied Meteorology degree program

Official National Weather Service forecast

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